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2017 Cemetery Tour

The 2017 Grave Matters Cemetery Tour was held on October 7, 2017.  Ten actors and actresses gathered at Forest View Cemetery on Saturday, October 7, to bring to life, long departed former residents of Forest Grove.  If you missed the tour (because it did sell out early) or want to see again, this page is a virtual tour of this year’s Grave Matters tour.  Click on a name to read and watch a video about the resident.

Harley S. McDonald

Architect
7/21/1825 – 7/21/1902

 

 

 

 

Harley S. McDonald was one of the early builders of our great Northwest.  Coming from Rhode Island, Harley first settled in San Francisco, and then made his way to Portland just in time to be a part of building some of Portland’s earliest infra-structure and the first steam ship on the Willamette River.

Mr. McDonald was a highly sought after architect in Oregon for many years. Several of the homes he built are still standing in Forest Grove and his own home was removed from here and reconstructed in the Helvetia area.

Portrayed by Ron Hansen. Script written by Mary Jo Morelli and Fletch Grylls

Click the button to watch my video or click here to read my story.

Manche Langley

Attorney
8/19/1883-7/13/1963

 

 

 

People liked to call Manche a pioneer, but not in the traditional Oregon sense of the word with covered wagons and dusty trails. She was a pioneer for women’s rights and female lawyers. 

She practiced law until the day she died at age 79, and throughout her career she worked to encourage and support other professional women and lawyers.

Portrayed by Linda Taylor. Script by Cindy Dauer.  Watch my story by clicking on the button, or read it here.

John Elkin Bailey

Bank Vice President
1845 – 1936

 

 

 

Born in 1845 in Greencastle, Indiana, John Elkin Bailey came to Oregon in 1873 and became an important civic leader in Forest Grove, and was a renaissance man of sorts. Some of his many occupations here included school teacher, farmer, station agent for Southern Pacific, merchant, bank vice-president, city councilman, and Pacific University trustee.  A resident for over 60 years, Bailey passed away in June 1936, five months after his wife Ella’s death.

Portrayed by Tom Cook. Script by Skip Buhler.  Watch my story by clicking on the button, or read it here.

Eliza Marsh

wife of Rev Sidney Marsh
August 26, 1841 – September 7, 1906

 

 

 

Eliza was married to Rev Sidney Marsh, the first president of Pacific University. In 1866, Mr. Marsh was traveling back East to establish funds for the College.  The letters he wrote to Eliza during this time are archived at Pacific University Library.  While her husband was away, Eliza was raising their young children.  She was a very supportive wife and was also involved in the growth of the University.  After her husband died in 1879 she moved her family into a new Victorian style home next to the University that still stands today.

Portrayed by Maureen Andronis Hicks. Script by Rebecca Vetkos.  Watch my story by clicking on the button, or read it here.

Carrie Crosley Minckley

Owner of Traveler’s Home
June 5, 1867 – Februrary 3, 1952

 

 

 

Carrie Crosley Minckley was born in Malmo, Sweden in 1867.  Her foster father was John Addison Slavin, an Oregon pioneer of 1850.  She attended Tualatin Academy in 1885.  In 1886, she married Jesse Crosley.  They had seven children.  The Oregon Electric Railroad came through the property between their house and their barn in 1908.  The day the train came through Jesse died.  Carrie then turned her home into a Traveler’s Home for nearly 40 years.  She owned many properties in Forest Grove and is remembered as the backbone of her family.

Portrayed by Amy Tracewell. Script by Cherie Savoie Tintary.  Watch my story by clicking on the button, or read it here.

Martha Lot

Indian Training School Student
1871 – 1881

 

 

 

The Forest Grove Indian and Industrial Training School was the second government facility of its kind.  It operated here from 1880 to 1885 when it was moved near Salem where it still exists today as the Chemawa Indian School.  We wanted to acknowledge those young Indians who were brought here to be assimilated into the dominant “white” world.  Martha (Mattie) Lot, a 10 year old girl from the Spokane Indians, was only in Forest Grove fro a few months when she died in October 1881, probably from Tuberculosis. S he was buried in this cemetery as were other children from the Indian Training School who died while attending.  The lot and grave number are recorded but there is no marker on Martha’s grave.

Portrayed by Sierra Deragon. Script by Mary Jo Morelli.  Watch my story by clicking on the button, or read it here.

Dorothy Higby Seymour

Owner, The Traveler’s Home
April 21, 1871 – August 26, 1972

 

 

 

Dorothy Higby Seymour was a woman who had one foot in the nineteenth century, and the other in the twentieth.  Born not long after the Civil War, Dorothy lived to see Neil Armstrong walk on the moon and women’s rights become a reality.  Confronted with the obstacles she faced, many would have thrown up their hands — but Dorothy was made of sterner stuff.

Portrayed by Kathleen Leatham. Script by Diane Morris.  Watch my story by clicking on the button, or read it here.

Harry A. Crosley

Photographer
May 11, 1866 – December 27, 1953

Harry A. Crosley was born in the town of Henry in Marshall County, Illinois, on May 11, 1866.  The fourth of eleven children, Harry came west with his father William Crosley to Forest Grove at the age of seven in 1872.  In the 1890s, Harry entered a partnership with Swiss emigre Charles Fritz and opened a photo studio above the Forest Grove Post Office where his father served as postmaster.

Portrayed by Alan Archer. Script by Lee Harry Tintary.  Watch my story by clicking on the button, or read it here.

 

Nellie Winfield Owens Kirry

Teacher
August 2, 1869 – November 2, 1949

 

 

 

 

From Walnut Grove, Minnesota to California, then to Tillamook and finally Forest Grove, Nellie’s story is a true pioneer girl’s saga.  The Owens family owned a store in Walnut Grove.  Nellie had a little brother, Willy, and an ‘adopted’ brother, Frank.  The family left California, traveled by covered wagon to Tillamook, and started dairy farming.  Nellie Owen’s life took a series of twists and turns before she landed in Forest Grove.  Nellie Winfield Ownes Kirry loved living here.  Perhaps the name of the settlement reminder her of her girlhood in Walnut Grove.

Portrayed by Chloe Lockett & Liza Schade. Script by Ginny Mapes.  Watch my story by clicking on the button, or read it here.

A Recap of the 2017 Grave Matters Cemetery Tour 

At the 2017 Cemetery Tour (L to R): John, Kahna, and Cherie Savoie Tintary (Cemetery Tour co-chair)

  • Has it already been 6 months since we picked our nine former residents to portray in the Grave Matter’s the cemetery tour?  Read more from this year’s cemetery tour co-chair, Cherie Savoie Tintary

 

  • Grave Matters 2017 marks the second time The Friends of Historic Forest Grove has brought local history to life by using actors to share the events that comprised the lives of some of the city’s fascinating former residents at the sites where they are buried. Ten actors and actresses gathered at Forest View Cemetery on Saturday, October 7.  Read the event wrap up write up.

 

 

List of Characters and Actors

Harley S. McDonald, architect
 

Harley S. McDonald, architect
7/21/1825 – 7/21/1902

Portrayed by Ron Hansen Harley S. McDonald was one of the early builders of our great Northwest.  He left his young bride in Rhode Island to seek his fortune on the Western frontier.  His apprenticeship in the craftsmanship of building paved his way to success.  He arrived in the newly named city of San Francisco at an opportune time to earn good money as a builder and also seek his fortune in the gold fields.  After some “close calls” he made his way to Portland just in time to be a part of building some of Portland’s earliest infra-structure and the first steam ship on the Willamette River. 

Mr. McDonald was a highly sought after architect in Oregon for many years.  Several of the homes he built are still standing in Forest Grove and his own home was removed from here and reconstructed in the Helvetia area. 

Click to hear my story (or read it here)

Manche Langley, attorney
Manche Langley, Attorney

Manche Langley, Attorney

Manche Langley, Attorney
8/19/1883-7/13/1963

Linda’s pic in character here
Portrayed by: Linda Taylor
People liked to call Manche a pioneer, but not in the traditional Oregon sense of the word with covered wagons and dusty trails. She was a pioneer for women’s rights and female lawyers. 

She practiced law until the day she died at age 79, and throughout her career she worked to encourage and support other professional women and lawyers.

Click to hear my story (or read it here)

John Bailey, Vice President Forest Grove National Bank
John Elkin Bailey

John Elkin Bailey

John Elkin Bailey, Bank Vice President
1845 – 1936

Portrayed by: Tom Cook Born in 1845 in Greencastle, Indiana, John Elkin Bailey came to Oregon in 1873 and became an important civic leader in Forest Grove, and was a renaissance man of sorts. Some of his many occupations here included school teacher, farmer, station agent for Southern Pacific, merchant, bank vice-president, city councilman, and Pacific University trustee.  A resident for over 60 years, Bailey passed away in June 1936, five months after his wife Ella’s death.

Click to hear my story (or read it here)

Eliza Marsh, wife of Rev. Sidney Harper Marsh
Eliza Marsh

Eliza Marsh

Eliza Marsh, Pastor’s Wife
Aug 26, 1841 – Sept 7, 1906

Portrayed by: Maureen Andronis Hicks Eliza was married to Rev Sidney Marsh, the first president of Pacific University. In 1866, Mr. Marsh was traveling back East to establish funds for the College.  The letters he wrote to Eliza during this time are archived at Pacific University Library.  While her husband was away, Eliza was raising their young children.  She was a very supportive wife and was also involved in the growth of the University.  After her husband died in 1879 she moved her family into a new Victorian style home next to the University that still stands today.

Click to hear my story (or read it here)

Carrie Crosley Minckley, Travelers Home
Carrie Crosley Minckley, Travelers Home
June 5, 1867 – February 3, 1952
Portrayed by: Amy Tracewell Carrie Crosley Minckley was born in Malmo, Sweden in 1867.  Her foster father was John Addison Slavin, an Oregon pioneer of 1850.  She attended Tualatin Academy in 1885.  In 1886, she married Jesse Crosley.  They had seven children.  The Oregon Electric Railroad came through the property between their house and their barn in 1908.  The day the train came through Jesse died.  Carrie then turned her home into a Traveler’s Home for nearly 40 years.  She owned many properti Forest Grove and is remembered as the backbone of her family.

Click to hear my story (or read it here)

Martha Lott, Indian Training School Student
Martha Lott, Student
1871-1881 
Portrayed by: Sierra Deragon The Forest Grove Indian and Industrial Training School was the second government facility of its kind.  It operated here from 1880 to 1885 when it was moved near Salem where it still exists today as the Chemawa Indian School.  We wanted to acknowledge those young Indians who were brought here to be assimilated into the dominant “white” world.  Martha (Mattie) Lot, a 10 year old girl from the Spokane Indians, was only in Forest Grove fro a few months when she died in October 1881, probably from Tuberculosis. S he was buried in this cemetery as were other children from the Indian Training School who died while attending.  The lot and grave number are recorded but there is no marker on Martha’s grave.

Click to hear my story (or read it here)

Dorothy Higby Seymour, business woman
 

Dorothy Higby Seymour, Business woman
April 21, 1871 – August 26, 1972
Portrayed by: Kathleen Leatham Dorothy Higby Seymour was a woman who had one foot in the nineteenth century, and the other in the twentieth.  Born not long after the Civil War, Dorothy lived to see Neil Armstrong walk on the moon and women’s rights become a reality.  Confronted with the obstacles she faced, many would have thrown up their hands — but Dorothy was made of sterner stuff.

Click to hear my story (or read it here)

Harry A. Crosley, photographer

Harry A. Crosley, Photographer
May 11, 1866 – December 27, 1953

Portrayed by: Alan Archer Harry A. Crosley was born in the town of Henry in Marshall County, Illinois, on May 11, 1866.  The fourth of eleven children, Harry came west with his father William Crosley to Forest Grove at the age of seven in 1872.  In the 1890s, Harry entered a partnership with Swiss emigre Charles Fritz and opened a photo studio above the Forest Grove Post Office where his father served as postmaster.

Click to hear my story (or read it here)

Nellie Winfield Owens Kirry, Teacher
 

Nellie Winfield Owens Kirry, Teacher
August 2, 1869 – November 2, 1949

Portrayed by: Chloe Lockett and Liza Schade From Walnut Grove, Minnesota to California, then to Tillamook and finally Forest Grove, Nellie’s story is a true pioneer girl’s saga.  The Owens family owned a store in Walnut Grove.  Nellie had a little brother, Willy, and an ‘adopted’ brother, Frank.  The family left California, traveled by covered wagon to Tillamook, and started dairy farming.  Nellie Owen’s life took a series of twists and turns before she landed in Forest Grove.  Nellie Winfield Ownes Kirry loved living here.  Perhaps the name of the settlement reminder her of her girlhood in Walnut Grove.

Click to hear my story (or read it here)